Early School Health Radio Shows — 18 October 2013
Mononucleosis

A look at what many have called “the kissing disease”. Mononucleosis.

Mononucleosis

Mononucleosis has often been called the kissing disease, probably because it’s spread through saliva.  It most commonly affects older kids and teens, but kissing isn’t necessarily a factor. Dr. Saul Greenberg, pediatrician at the Hospital for Sick Children elaborates. “We see it most often in older children and adolescents, and the usual manifestation is a very sore throat, high fever, they will often get very large glands and on examination a doctor will often notice these large glands and sometimes a spleen as well. There is no specific medication for mononucleosis because it usually resolves on its own.”  While self-limiting, for some the symptoms of mononucleosis can drag on. “Often in adolescents we see they may have a sore throat and fever lasting for a week, but them one gets prolonged fatigue afterwards. That fatigue or other symptoms varies from person to person.”

The Parent Report’s guest expert is Dr. Saul Greenberg, pediatrician at the Hospital for Sick Children elaborates.

Adapted from The Parent Report Radio Show. Any advice or information contained herein should never be a substitute for professional and/or medical advice, diagnosis and treatment. For more information please review Terms of Service.

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